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Typographic Forestry and Other Landscapes of Translation


[Image: The cover for About Trees, edited by Katie Holten]. Artist Katie Holten has just published an interesting book called About Trees.

Books Received


I haven't done one of these in a long, long time... Here are twenty-seven new or recent books, ranging from true crime to science fiction, architecture to media theory, for your back-to-school or end-of-summer reading pleasure.

Informational Topographics


[Image: "FOGBAE.TWR4" by Mike Winkelmann, 07.06.15]. Since 2007, artist Mike Winkelmann has been producing an image a day, primarily using Cinema 4D, though all the specific tools differ year by year.

By the Mile


[Images: I've been enjoying a new Instagram feed called The Jefferson Grid, which describes itself as "everything that fits in a square mile." These images are just screen grabs from the feed, which is well worth scrolling back through in its entirety (and which will hopefully stick around for many

"It's almost like he wanted to collect every map ever made"


Alec Earnest recently made an interesting documentary about a house in Los Angeles whose owner died, leaving behind a personal map collection so massive that, upon being acquisitioned by the city's public library, "it doubled the LAPL’s collection in a single day." When LAPL map librarian Glen Creason, interviewed for the film, first entered the house, his jaw dropped; "everywhere I looked in the house, there's maps," he explains in the film, including an entire floor that was "absolutely wall to wall with street guides." [Image: From Living History: The John Feathers Map Collection by Alec Earnest].

Abandoned Basements as Stormwater Basins


[Image: Rendering of a possible "BaseTern" landscape by students Brett Harris, Andrew D'Arcy, and Heidi Petersen, via Landscape Architecture Magazine].

Hacked Homes, Gas Attacks, and Panic Room Design


[Image: "How The Burglar Gets Into Your House" (1903), via The Saint Paul Globe]. One unfortunate side-effect of the Greek financial crisis has been a rise in domestic burglaries.

Subterranean Lightning Brigade


[Image: "Riggers install a lightning rod" atop the Empire State Building "in preparation for an investigation into lightning by scientists of the General Electric Company" (1947), via the Library of Congress].

From Guns, Bridges


[Image: An otherwise unrelated shot of rebar used in road construction; via Wikipedia]. A quick news item from last month seems worth mentioning: "approximately 3,400 confiscated firearms" are being melted down and turned into rebar to be used for bridge and highway construction projects throughout the American Southwest.

Joyful Rendezvous Upon Pure Ice and Snow


[Image: Snow-making equipment via Wikipedia]. The 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing are something of a moonshot moment for artificial snow-making technology: the winter games will be held "in a place with no snow." That's right: "the 2022 Olympics will rely entirely on artificial snow." As a report released by the International Olympic Committee admits, "The Zhangjiakou and Yanqing Zones have minimal annual snowfall and for the Games would rely completely on artificial snow.

Landscapes of Inevitable Catastrophe


[Image: Illustration by David McConochie, courtesy of The Art Market, via The Guardian]. Last month, The Economist reported on the widespread presence of partially radioactive tailings piles—waste rock left over from Soviet mining operations—in southern Kyrgyzstan.

Horse Skull Disco


[Image: Horse skull via Wikimedia]. If you're looking to install a new sound system in your house, consider burying a horse skull in the floor.

Full-Spectrum Mandala


[Image: Via the Pacific Cold War Patrol Museum]. Somewhat randomly—though I suppose I have a thing for antennas—I came across a blog post looking at the layout of Circularly Disposed Antenna Arrays.

Burglary & Rabies


People of Denver! If you are around next week, MCA Denver's legendary Mixed Taste series roars along with a new installment on Thursday, August 6, dedicated to "Burglary & Rabies." I'm proud to be representing the burglary part of the evening, discussing some behind-the-scenes tales and spatial research from my forthcoming book, A Burglar's Guide to the City, due out in Spring 2016; Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy, co-authors of Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus, will be holding down the infectious vectors for the night's darker half.

Horizon Line


[Image: Here's another image from the same French rare-book seller seen in an earlier post; this one comes from Thomas Alcock's Travels in Russia, Persia, Turkey and Greece, printed in 1831.

A Well-Tailored Landscape


[Image: Sewn geology; photo by Matthew Cox of Kit Up!]. Earlier this summer, packaging and apparel manufacturing firm ReadyOne Industries debuted a new line of products: "moldable camouflage kits that can be customized to mimic virtually any type of rock formation or similar type of terrain." The sewn geological forms seen here—in photos taken by Matthew Cox of Kit Up!

Pop-Up


[Image: A figure and his optical context pop up from the pages of a 17th-century treatise on perspective by Abraham Bosse, defending the ideas of Girard Desargues; taken from the website of a French rare-book seller, via John Overholt.

This Is Only A Test


[Image: From Ways of Knowing by Daniel Stier, on display at the kulturreich gallery]. Photographer Daniel Stier has a new book out, and an accompanying exhibition on display at the kulturreich gallery, called Ways of Knowing.

Village Design as Magnetic Storage Media


[Image: "Magnetic Field" by Berenice Abbott, from The Science Pictures (1958-1961)]. An interesting new paper suggests that the ritual practice of burning parts of villages to the ground in southern Africa had an unanticipated side-effect: resetting the ground's magnetic data storage potential.

Buy a Los Angeles Sidewalk Corner


[Image: A sidewalk corner in Los Angeles, albeit not the one for sale; via Google Street View]. If you've been longing for a way to satisfy your inner Gordon Matta-Clark—the artist who, among many other things, once purchased an interstitial empire of "odd lots" throughout New York City, including the spaces between buildings and other "unusably small slivers of land sliced from the city grid through anomalies in surveying, zoning, and public-works expansion"—then now might be your chance.


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