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Architecture-by-Bee and Other Animal Printheads


[Image: By John Becker]. For thousands of years now, animal bodies have been used as living 3D printers—or sentient printheads, we might say—but the range of possible material outputs is now set to change quite radically.

Circular


[Image: Photo by A. William Frederick]. While on a trip to Maine last week—a quick search for some badly needed R&R—I very nearly made the long hike out to visit these incredible structures designed by the late Bill Coperthwaite.

Buy a Lighthouse


[Image: Photo courtesy General Services Administration]. A remote, 76-foot lighthouse is for sale in Maine, and it could be yours for only $30,000.

Road Trips, Routes, and Landscape Instrumentation


[Image: Venue at the Center for Art + Environment, Nevada Museum of Art; courtesy Nevada Museum of Art].

Go Fish


[Image: Photo by Jesse Rockwell/Rex Features, via The Verge]. You might already have seen this small gallery of images showing an abandoned shopping mall in Bangkok, now partially flooded and "infested with koi carp and catfish." The images—taken by Jesse Rockwell—were originally published on the photographer's own blog back in October.

X


It's hard to believe, but BLDGBLOG began exactly ten years ago today. It's been a life-changing and incredibly unexpected decade for me, and, although 10-year birthdays justifiably mean little in the world of online publishing, I nonetheless wanted to mark the date with a quick post and a thanks: thanks for reading, commenting, critiquing, and following along, whoever and wherever you are.

Buffer Space


[Image: Photo taken by Your Captain Aerial Photography, via Wired]. Here are two short, conceptually related pieces to read, both of which revolve around the notion of a buffer landscape: a marginal, otherwise unused land that is nonetheless deliberately maintained as a spatial intermediary between two very different zones.

The Snow Mine


[Image: The "Blythe Intaglios," via Google Maps]. After reading an article about the "Blythe geoglyphs"—huge, 1,000-year old images carved into the California desert north of Blythe, near the border with Arizona—I got to looking around on Google Maps more or less at random and found what looked like a small ghost town in the middle of nowhere, located close to a mine.

Urban Giants

The husband & wife team of director Davina Pardo and journalist Andrew Blum—the latter of whom you might also know as the author of Tubes and a prolific writer on architecture and design—have released a short documentary about the literal architecture of the internet: the huge buildings looming amongst us here in New York City, inside of which sit much of the telecommunications equipment that switches, routes, and relays global internet traffic.

Drive-By Archaeology


[Image: From a patent filed by MIT, courtesy U.S. Patent and Trademark Office]. The technical systems by which autonomous, self-driving vehicles will safely navigate city streets are usually presented as some combination of real-time scanning and detailed mnemonic map or virtual reference model created for that vehicle.

A City Swollen With the Dead


[Image: By Andrew Winning, courtesy of Reuters, via National Geographic]. In her excellent and morbidly fascinating book Necropolis: London and Its Dead, Catharine Arnold describes in detail how parts of the London Underground were tunneled, blasted, picked, and drilled through a labyrinth of plague pits and cemeteries.

A Pyramid in the Middle of Nowhere Built to Track the End of the World


[Image: Photo by Benjamin Halpern, courtesy of the U.S. Library of Congress]. The Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, is the focus of an amazing set of images hosted by the U.S.

Where Borders Melt


[Image: From Italian Limes. Photo by Delfino Sisto Legnani, courtesy of Folder]. One of the most interesting sites from a course I taught several years ago at Columbia—Glacier, Island, Storm—was the glacial border between Italy and Switzerland.

Perspectival Objects


[Image: A perspectival representation of the "ideal city," artist unknown]. There's an interesting throwaway line in The Verge's write-up of yesterday's Amazon phone launch event, where blogger David Pierce remarks that the much-hyped public unveiling of Amazon's so-called Fire Phone was "oddly focused on art history and perspective." As another post at the site points out, "Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos likened it to the move from flat artwork to artwork with geometric perspective which began in the 14th century." These are passing comments, sure, and, from Amazon's side, it's more marketing hype than anything like rigorous phenomenological theorizing.

An Occult History of the Television Set


The origin of the television set was heavily shrouded in both spiritualism and the occult, Stefan Andriopoulos writes in his new book Ghostly Apparitions.

Proprietary Microcosms


[Image: Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images, via In Focus/The Atlantic]. Spaces of military simulation have long been a theme of interest here, including the desert test-cities of California's Fort Irwin or the law enforcement training architecture of U.S.

Proprietary Microcosms


[Image: Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images, via In Focus/The Atlantic]. Spaces of military simulation have long been a theme of interest here, including the fake training cities of California's Fort Irwin or the law enforcement training architecture of U.S.

Welcome to the World of the Plastic Beach


[Image: The new plastic geology, photographed by Patricia Corcoran, via Science]. Incredibly, a "new type of rock cobbled together from plastic, volcanic rock, beach sand, seashells, and corals has begun forming on the shores of Hawaii," Science reports.

Welcome to the World of the Plastic Beach


[Image: The new plastic geology, photographed by Patricia Corcoran, via Science]. Incredibly, a "new type of rock cobbled together from plastic, volcanic rock, beach sand, seashells, and corals has begun forming on the shores of Hawaii," Science reports.

City of Buried Machines


[Image: Courtesy of London Basement]. A story of buried digging machines made something of an unexpected splash over at New Statesman this week, quickly becoming their weekend's most-read article.


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