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This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 28


July 28, 1932: The Latin-Chanting Ghost of Joliet As word spread of a ghost that chanted songs in Latin at midnight in the graveyard of the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet, crowds of hundreds of people (pictured) started gathering to hear the phantom crooner.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 27


July 27, 1907: The Wedding of the Ancients On this day, a widely reported wedding to unite John B. Bundren, Sr.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 26


July 26, 2011: Internet Explorer Users Are Dumb On this day, AptiQuant Psychometric Consulting Co. released a study revealing that Internet Explorer users scored lower on IQ tests than users of other web browsers and were therefore "dumb".

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 25


July 25, 1990: Operation Blackbird Hoaxed On this day, the high-tech Operation Blackbird, whose mission was to record the creation of a crop circle by a UFO, appeared to meet with success.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 24


July 24, 1907: The Old Librarian's Almanack On this day, Edmund Leaster Pearson first mentioned the existence of the Old Librarian's Almanack in his column in the Boston Evening Transcript.

Fossil Poop Controversy


I.M. Chait auctioneer will soon be taking bids on what it describes as the "longest example of coprolite [i.e.

Fishy Research


Many media outlets (such as NPR) recently ran a feel-good story about how a sixth-grader made an important scientific discovery.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 23


July 23, 1943: The Death of Ern Malley The unknown Australian poet Ern Malley was said to have died of Graves' disease on this day, prompting his sister to send the poems she found among his possessions to Max Harris, editor of the Angry Penguins poetry journal, who then decided to dedicate a special issue to Malley's strange poems.

The ‘We only use 10% of our brains’ myth


In an article in The Atlantic, Sam McDougle traces the origin of the often repeated belief that "you only use 10 percent of your brain." He writes: "According to Sam Wang, a neuroscientist at Princeton and the author of Welcome to Your Brain, the catalyst may have been the self-help industry.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 22


July 22, 1931: Mr. A.A. declared man with shortest name On this day, Mr. A.A. (first name Aaron) was declared to be the man with the shortest name in the United States, following the death of H.P.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 21


July 21, 1959: Jacqueline Gay Hart Disappears Hart, a 21-year-old heiress, disappeared from Newark airport and was the subject of a nationwide search for two days until she turned up in Chicago's Grant Park, claiming she had been abducted by two men who drove her, bound and gagged, to Chicago.

Fried Chicken Oreos


Fried Chicken Oreos are not a real thing. The photo of a bag of them that went viral this week was a fake.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 20


July 20, 1971: The National Review Hoax The conservative National Review magazine released a set of documents that it claimed were secret government papers dealing with the war in Vietnam.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 19


July 19, 2002: The Case of a Phony 9/11 Survivor On this day, the Tahoe Daily Tribune reported the inspirational story of Daniel McCarthy, who had just been wed in Lake Tahoe.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 18


July 18, 1938: Wrong Way Corrigan On this day, Douglas Corrigan landed at Baldonnel Aerodrome in Ireland after a solo, 28-hour flight across the Atlantic.

Milkybar Pareidolia


While watching the World Cup, a British lawyer (Robin Jacobs) was eating a Milkybar and noticed that the design imprinted on the bar includes a phallic shape that he believes is inappropriate for children.

Full Contact Skydiving


Full Contact Skydiving is defined (according to the website that promotes it) as "a mixed martial art combat sport occurring in the free-fall portion of a standard skydiving jump." But no, it isn't real.

Shark in Lake Ontario


A video released last week showing a group of fishermen having an encounter with a shark in Lake Ontario has proven to be a hoax.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 17


July 17, 1842: The Feejee Mermaid Inspired by the arrival in the city of a "Dr. J. Griffin" who claimed to have the body of a mermaid in his possession, New York City papers all ran mermaid pictures (supplied to them by PT Barnum), showing the creatures as seductive ocean maidens.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: July 16


July 16, 1866: The Calaveras Skull At the July 16, 1866 meeting of the California Academy of Science, Josiah Whitney announced the recent discovery of a skull that he believed to be evidence that humans had been in North America for millions of years.


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