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The Museum of Hoaxes is Moving!

We're moving to a new server, because our old webhost is shutting down. And I decided to use this opportunity to also change the URL of the site, from museumofhoaxes.com to hoaxes.org.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 19


August 19, 1961: $20,000 Award a Hoax For years, Inez Miller of Pasadena, CA had worked behind a desk as a receptionist.

My Trip to Willow Creek, Bigfoot Capital of the World


This weekend I returned from a two-week roadtrip with my wife through Northern California and Oregon.

Facebook debuts satire tag

Facebook is debuting a "satire" tag to identify articles that are intended as parody. Although the tag currently only appears in lists of "Related Articles".

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 18


August 18, 1999: Criswell Predicts the End of the World In his book Criswell Predicts From Now to the Year 2000 (published 1968), the American psychic Criswell predicted that the end of the world would occur on August 18, 1999.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 17


August 17, 1921: S.O.S. Pigeon Note Hoax A carrier pigeon dropped at the feet of a policeman in Columbus Circle, NYC.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 16


August 16, 1926: Lord Kitchener's Coffin Opened British war hero Lord Kitchener was killed at sea in 1916, his body never recovered.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 15


August 15, 2008: Bigfoot in a Freezer Hoax Rick Dyer and Matthew Whitton held a press conference in Palo Alto where they answered questions about their claim that they had found the body of a Bigfoot while hiking in the Georgia woods.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 14


August 14, 1927: The Disumbrationist Hoax Revealed Novelist Paul Jordan Smith, upset that his wife's art was panned by critics as being too "old school," devised an elaborate spoof of modern art.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 13


August 13, 1940: The Nazi Parachute Landing Hoax On this day, numerous German parachutes landed throughout the north of England, but no parachutists could be found.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 12


August 12, 1965: The Great Yak Fat Hoax On this day, the Great Yak Fat hoax made headlines throughout the United States.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 11


August 11, 1966: Fastest submarine crosses the Atlantic Josef Papp was found floating in a life raft near Brest, France.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 10


August 10, 1840: The Fortsas Bibliohoax Numerous book collectors arrived in Binche, Belgium, hoping to attend the sale of the library of the Comte de Fortsas, advertised as taking place on this day (Aug 10) in 1840.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 9


August 9, 1962: The Hastings Rarities Fraud Taxidermist George Bristow had a reputation for being able to find rare birds, which he stuffed and sold at high prices to collectors.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 8


August 8, 1903: Trial of Thérèse Humbert Begins Thérèse Humbert declared herself to be the sole heir of an American millionaire whom she had saved from food poisoning, and on the basis of this was able to obtain loans from leading French bankers for millions of francs.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 7


August 7, 1926: The Midwife Toad Fraud Exposed Biologist Paul Kammerer had observed that when he forced "midwife toads" to mate in water (they usually mate on land) their offspring, several generations later, had developed black traction pads on their forelimbs, which made water-mating easier for them.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 6


August 6, 1969: Naked Came the Stranger Revealed The novel Naked Came the Stranger, credited to Penelope Ashe, had sold a respectable 20,000 copies.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 5


August 5, 1934: The Oldest Ear of Corn Debunked After displaying an object for 20 years that it had believed to be the "oldest ear of corn" in the world (supposedly fossilized corn several thousand years old), the Smithsonian Institution admitted on this day that the object, upon closer examination, had been revealed to be a clay rattle shaped like corn.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 4


August 4, 1972: Female Wanted to Become Pregnant An ad placed in a Philadelphia paper sought a "female to become pregnant" in return for a "$10,000 fee plus expenses." A reporter who called the number reached Leonard Goldfarb, who claimed he was representing a childless couple.

This Day in the History of Hoaxes: August 3


August 3, 1965: Rex Heflin Photographs a UFO On this day in 1965, highway maintenance worker Rex Heflin stopped his truck as he was driving outside Santa Ana, CA and took a series of photos that he claimed showed a UFO hovering in the sky.


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