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Babe Ruth’s Called Shot—Did it really happen?


A new book by Ed Sherman examines the question of whether Babe Ruth actually called a shot in the 1932 World Series.

The Afghan Prince, 1954


In 1954, Syed Hassan Osman Mustapha was a young man from Pakistan studying in London. One day he was invited to attend a "knighthood" ceremony at a Rover Scout Group meeting, and while he was there he mentioned that he happened to be part of the royal family of Afghanistan.

Crying Child Photo Controversy


There's some controversy over the Daily Mirror's recent cover showing a crying child. The context implies it's a British child crying because of a lack of food, but (as blogger Dan Barker uncovered) it's actually an American child who was crying because she lost an earthworm.

Divine Tear?


A statue of the Virgin Mary outside a church in Griffith, Indiana has recently attracted attention because a stain on the statue's face looks like a tear.

Fire Dragon

If this was just a random unsourced picture on the Internet I would probably suspect that it had been manipulated to create the dragon effect.

Paradise Closed


This sign appeared on a road in the town of Cambridge, UK on April 1st. There was some speculation that it might have been a joke, but the Cambridge News confirms that it actually was a genuine sign for a temporary road closure.

The Rock-Rolling Whitefish


The rock-rolling whitefish is a little-known species of fish, whose existence has only ever been reported (as far as I know) in the June 1932 issue of Montana Wild Life magazine.

He forgot his camera


Steve Feltham has spent 23 years looking for Nessie. In all that time, he's only seen her once, 21 years ago.

Speakerphone Pregnancy Call Terrifies Teacher

The video of this April Fool's Day prank, played by students at Aquinas College on their Macroeconomics professor, now has over 25 millions views on YouTube, which has to make it one of the most popular April Fool pranks this year (if not the most popular).

The Salida Fur-Bearing Trout


The Travel Channel show "Mysteries at the Museum" recently filmed an episode at the Salida Museum in Colorado, where they dug into the history of the fur-bearing trout.

Is the Voynich manuscript a modern forgery?


Simon Worrall, author of "The Poet and the Murderer" (about the Mark Hoffman forgeries) recently wrote an article for BBC News Magazine about the Voynich manuscript.

No, Beyonce is not offering to pay her interns with selfies


HerCampus, a news site for women in college, recently posted that Beyoncé was looking for interns to help organize the "official Beyoncé archive." She wasn't offering any financial compensation, but she did promise "the opportunity to take three selfies with Beyoncé over the course of the internship." Quite a few media outlets picked up on the story and reported it as news.

Has April Fool’s Day Marketing Jumped The Shark?


This e-junkie author complains that April Fool's Day marketing has gotten out of hand. There definitely was a huge amount of it this year.

The Rossendale Fairies


Manchester artist John Hyatt took some photographs of the landscape around Rossendale in Lancashire. But when he later enlarged those he images he noticed they showed tiny winged creatures that looked like fairies.

Why doesn’t America read anymore?


NPR succeeded in pulling off one of the most successful April 1 pranks this year, in terms of number of people fooled.

Scary Emu


Seen circulating online with the caption "Just some friendly Australian wildlife". Of course, emus don't have teeth like that.

The Yankee Rubber Baby


The Yankee Rubber Baby was, as the name suggests, an American-made rubber baby doll. Advertisements for it appeared in many newspapers and magazines throughout the 1880s.

Siamese twins joined by their beard, 1937


April 1, 1937 — The Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung ran a story about Siamese twins joined by their beard.

Happy April Fool’s Day!

It seems like the site's server isn't crashing, as it usually does on April 1! So that's good news. I've been posting a bunch of today's April Fools over at the Hoax Museum Facebook page, since it's easier to post stuff quickly over there.

Salton Sea Freezes, 1906—the NYT’s only April Fool’s Day Hoax


The New York Times does not participate in the custom of April Fool's Day. It's the paper that only publishes "news that's fit to print," and April fool absurdities don't make the cut.


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