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Europe is about to make most of its stock market off-limits to secretive “dark pools”


What do Unilever and Rolls-Royce have in common? Both companies’ stocks will probably be blocked from “dark pool” trading when new EU regulations kick in next year.

How the map of Jammu & Kashmir could have been significantly different today


The 1947-48 war with Pakistan was baptism by fire for independent India’s armed forces and, contrary to common perception, much of its contemporary DNA can be attributed to what emerged from the year-long conflict.

It’s stupid to sell online, says one of India’s biggest retailers


Retail majors, both Indian and global, are undoubtedly kicked about the Indian e-commerce space. Jeff Bezos of Amazon on June 25 assured prime minister Narendra Modi of his continued investments.

How Japanese partnerships and Indian whiskey spawned a $9 billion automotive giant


Before Vivek Chaand Sehgal made a name in the business of building car components and the craft of forging lucrative partnerships, he was toying with the idea of manufacturing plastic drinking straws.

Mumbai has the world’s second-largest collection of Art Deco buildings but no one notices them


Visitors to Miami rarely miss an opportunity to admire the city’s Art Deco heritage. In the historic architectural district, you’ll find tourists capturing every painstakingly preserved detail on camera, from the buildings’ smooth lines and curved balconies to the pastel-coloured facades and porthole windows.

The things jobless engineers should do to get back into India’s IT game


Whether you’re fresh out of engineering college or a few years into your career, all the bad news surrounding India’s IT industry is understandably a cause for concern.

I’m sad for my friend Liu Xiaobo, and for a China that can’t cherish its finest


Liu Xiaobo, winner of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize and one of China’s greatest thinkers and pro-democracy activists, is in dire health, diagnosed with terminal liver cancer after serving nine years out of an 11-year sentence for “inciting subversion of state power.” I found out about my friend’s illness on Monday (June 26), as information from his lawyers spread across social media, close to a month after he was reportedly diagnosed with cancer.

People around the world have more confidence in Vladimir Putin than in Donald Trump


In the final weeks of Barack Obama’s presidency, he admonished the 37% of Republican voters who said they approved of Russian president Vladimir Putin.

In premodern Japan, it was common for aristocrats and samurai to pursue male lovers


I’m an anthropologist who grew up in Japan and has lived there, off and on, for 22 years. Yet every visit to Tokyo’s Harajuku district still surprises me.

The photos of doorless shops hidden in Beijing’s alleyways that China is censoring


Hutong, the slender alleyways flanked by single-story courtyard homes, were once ubiquitous in old Beijing.

Cantonese isn’t dead yet, so stop writing its eulogy


When I decided to start studying Mandarin as a teenager, friends and family approved. China was enjoying explosive economic growth, so speaking the country’s lingua franca was sure to open doors.

You can download Apple’s latest software right now—if you’re a daredevil


If you’re fine with living your digital life a little bit on the edge, you can now download the latest versions of Apple’s mobile, iOS 11, and computer operating systems, macOS High Sierra.

Celebrities celebrate JK Rowling’s moving story of personal struggle and the pursuit of art


In a world of Muggles, the best thing you can do to mark the 20th anniversary of the first Harry Potter book is find your inner wizard—and create something out of nothing.

Neil Gorsuch’s early opinions reveal a deeply conservative Supreme Court justice


During a US presidential debate in October, then candidate Donald Trump said he would be looking to appoint Supreme Court justices “in the mold” of the late Antonin Scalia.

Trump proclaimed June the official month of many things—with one glaring omission


Here’s a list of things that US president Donald Trump has proclaimed June 2017: Great Outdoors Month National Caribbean-American Heritage Month African-American Music Appreciation Month National Ocean Month National Home Ownership Month You might notice one missing.

The US Supreme Court’s ruling on Trump’s travel ban helps neither refugees nor national security


Donald Trump’s attempt to stop letting citizens from six (originally seven) majority-Muslim countries into the US was one of his first moves as president, and it ran into repeated legal challenges.

What re-reading my strip-poker Harry Potter fan fiction from 2004 taught me about being a writer


“One Christmas night, when Hermione and Ron get themselves into a thought-provoking game of cards, they start wagering more than just their Bertie Bott’s.” This is the synopsis of a piece of Harry Potter fan fiction I wrote in 2004 at the age of 14.

The US Supreme Court just sided with religion in one of the most important church and state cases of our time


Child’s play got very serious indeed at the US Supreme Court today (June 26). The justices decided a major case about separation of church and state arising from a dispute over playground funding in Missouri—with implications for all US taxpayers.

The Republicans’ health-care cuts would affect 62% of the Americans in nursing homes


The Republican attempt to re-write the US health-care system is the main story in Washington this week, and the focus is largely on how the bill cuts spending on Medicaid, the health program for poorer Americans.

Google will no longer mine your emails for advertising data


Google announced in a blog post on Friday (June 23) that it will no longer scan emails in personal Gmail accounts to pull out data for targeted ads.


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