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Cassini's Bittersweet Symphony

The Cassini team members filled the chairs of mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Cassini Scientist Would Be Surprised if Life Doesn't Exist on Enceladus

The Cassini spacecraft has entered its final hours. And with the end nigh, Discover called up the Southwest Research Institute’s Hunter Waite — a Cassini principal investigator — for a look back at how this has redefined our view of where alien life might live in our solar system.

How the Folsom Point Became an Archaeological Icon

The Folsom spear point, which was excavated in 1927 near the small town of Folsom, New Mexico, is one of the most famous artifacts in North American archaeology, and for good reason: It was found in direct association with the bones of an extinct form of Ice Age bison.

Does It Snow on Mars?

Given that there are ambitious plans to colonize Mars in the near future, it is surprising how much we still have to learn about what it would be like to actually live on the planet.

On the Shores of Lake Erie, Endangered Birds Catch a Lucky Break

Protecting species in peril doesn't happen overnight. Rather, it's all about stringing together small wins that, in the long-term, make all the difference.

Why Are Oddly Satisfying Videos So...Satisfying?

If you've never seen a master lathe operator at work, I highly recommend it. Deft movements and practiced flourishes turn a block of spinning wood into a bedpost, top, bowl or some other circular object, each motion peeling away curls of wood to uncover the beauty hidden inside.

Wait, What Happened in Cuba?

U.S.-Cuban relations have taken an unusual turn after several U.S. diplomats, and at least one Canadian diplomat, experienced hearing damage after being targeted by a covert “sonic device” in Havana.

Wait, What Happened in Cuba?

U.S.-Cuban relations have taken an unusual turn after several U.S. diplomats, and at least one Canadian diplomat, experienced hearing damage after being targeted by a covert “sonic device” in Havana.

Crucial Steps Ahead for Flying Cars

Flying cars are up against a wall — literally. Turning aircraft into street-safe machines requires manufacturers to prove their safety standards in crash tests.

What's Going On With the World's Most Destructive Mud Volcano?

The world’s most destructive mud volcano was born near the town of Sidoarjo, on the island of Java, Indonesia, just over 11 years ago – and to this day it has not stopped erupting.

What Would It Take to Wipe Out All Life on Earth?

The first exoplanet was spotted in 1988. Since then more than 3,000 planets have been found outside our solar system, and it’s thought that around 20 percent of Sun-like stars have an Earth-like planet in their habitable zones.

Can Breathing Like Wim Hof Make Us Superhuman?

Take a deep breath. Feel the wave of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide press against the bounds of your ribcage and swell your lungs.

Memory Repression: A Dubious Theory That's Sticking Around

Compared to the other generational tragedies of the late '80s and early '90s, the rise of memory repression cases is hardly remembered.

Designing a Safer Explosive

This Fourth of July, as you and your family settle on a sandy beach or grassy lawn to watch a fireworks display, you’re probably not thinking about the science behind the explosives you’re witnessing.

Will Robots Rule Finance?

The year is 2030. You’re in a business school lecture hall, where just a handful of students are attending a finance class.

When Did People Start Using Money?

Sometimes you run across a grimy, tattered dollar bill that seems like it’s been around since the beginning of time.

Creating a Universe in the Lab? The Idea Is No Joke

Physicists aren’t often reprimanded for using risqué humor in their academic writings, but in 1991 that is exactly what happened to the cosmologist Andrei Linde at Stanford University.

For Funding, Scientists Turn to Unorthodox Sources

When Donna Riordan first moved to the idyllic Orcas Island just off the coast of Washington state, she had no plans of doing any sort of research, despite her background in science and education policy.

Meet Dean Lomax, Master of the Prehistoric 'Death March'

Paleontologists study creatures that have long ceased to be, all in the hopes of "resurrecting" the history of their lives on Earth.

The Mother of All Apples Is Disappearing

In the wilds of Kazakhstan, there’s an unassuming tree that bears an unassuming fruit. Like many plant species, development encroaches on its usual territory while climate change makes it harder for the tree to thrive and bear healthy yields of fruit.


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