All Your Web In One Place.

Everything you want to read - news, your favorite blogs, art and more - in one convenient place designed for you.

Learn more about MultiPLX or signup for personalized experience.


We Should Toss That $450M da Vinci into a Particle Accelerator

A portrait of the world’s most recognizable person, Jesus Christ, painted by an icon whose renown doesn’t trail too far behind, Leonardo da Vinci, on Wednesday sold at auction for $450.3 million, setting a new record for artistic largesse.

Signatures of Alzheimer's Disease Discovered in Dolphins

A team of scientists in the United Kingdom and the U.S. recently reported the discovery of pathological signs of Alzheimer’s disease in dolphins, animals whose brains are similar in many ways to those of humans.

Is Cannabis an Effective Sleep Aid?

If you speak to someone who has suffered from insomnia at all as an adult, chances are good that person has either tried using marijuana, or cannabis, for sleep or has thought about it.

Jane Goodall, Redux

Jane Goodall has been a flashpoint in science circles. Was her years-long study of chimpanzees in the Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania real science?

Hey Kim, Stephen Hawking's PhD Thesis Also 'Broke the Internet'

The PhD thesis of perhaps the world’s most famous living scientist, Professor Stephen Hawking, was recently made publicly available online.

When Wealth Inequality Arose

We’ve heard how great times used to be, and I don’t mean in 1950s America. For eons, our hunter-gatherer ancestors shared their spoils with one another, didn’t own much and had very little social hierarchy.

Marie Curie: Iconic Scientist, Nobel Prize Winner...War Hero?

Ask people to name the most famous historical woman of science and their answer will likely be: Madame Marie Curie.

We Almost Gave Up On Building Artificial Brains

Today artificial neural networks are making art, writing speeches, identifying faces and even driving cars.

Acupuncture Works by 'Re-Wiring' the Brain, Evidence Suggests

Acupuncture is a form of traditional medical therapy that originated in China several thousand years ago.

Brazil's Moon Tree Warrior

On a warm, windy August day in 1981, a crowd gathered at the fairgrounds in Santa Rosa for the final event of the soybean fair that’s held every other year in the small city in southern Brazil.

An Orbital Moon Station Is Our Gateway to Mars

The dream of a human habitat in orbit about the moon came a step closer on Sept. 27, when NASA and the Russian space agency (Roscosmos) signed up to a common vision for future human exploration.

Eat Less, Age Less?

Eating is one of the great pleasures of life. But eating too much places people at risk for chronic illnesses and shortens life expectancy.

How Vulnerable Are Societies to Collapse?

Along the cottonwood-lined rivers of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona, the Mimbres people did something unique: By the year 1000, these farmers were producing stunning ceramics decorated with naturalistic images of fish, people, and rabbits, as well as magical creatures and elaborate geometric patterns.

Earth’s Oldest Rocks Are Revealing Life’s Origins, Fueling Controversy

Earth’s first life evolved in hell. The earliest lifeforms emerged at least 3.95 billion years ago, at a time when a near constant barrage of comets and asteroids were bombarding our still solidifying planet.

A Steady Diet of TV Could Be Key for Deep Space Travelers

No one knows for sure what a long-range space journey will be like for the people on board. Nobody in the history of our species has ever had to deal with the “Earth-out-of-view” phenomenon, for instance.

Lake Michigan Itself Is the Greatest Asian Carp Deterrent

For years, people have been freaking out that Asian carp are about to invade the Great Lakes. That concern seemed more real than ever this summer after an Illinois fisherman caught a carp in June less than 10 miles from Lake Michigan — beyond the barriers designed to keep them out.

How the Invention of Zero Yielded Modern Mathematics

A small dot on an old piece of birch bark marks one of the biggest events in the history of mathematics.

Cassini's Bittersweet Symphony

The Cassini team members filled the chairs of mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Cassini Scientist Would Be Surprised if Life Doesn't Exist on Enceladus

The Cassini spacecraft has entered its final hours. And with the end nigh, Discover called up the Southwest Research Institute’s Hunter Waite — a Cassini principal investigator — for a look back at how this has redefined our view of where alien life might live in our solar system.

How the Folsom Point Became an Archaeological Icon

The Folsom spear point, which was excavated in 1927 near the small town of Folsom, New Mexico, is one of the most famous artifacts in North American archaeology, and for good reason: It was found in direct association with the bones of an extinct form of Ice Age bison.


Loading...