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Where students learn the most


Emily Badger and Kevin Quealy, reporting for the Upshot, highlights research from Sean Reardon, a professor of poverty and inequality in education.

[For Members] How to Arrange Small Multiples in a State Map Grid Layout in R


Combining small multiples with the grid layout can make for an intuitive geographic reference. Read More

How artificial intelligence can augment our own


There’s another essay on Distill by Shan Carter and Michael Nielsen. They describe and demonstrate how one might use artificial intelligence to augment human intelligence.

Serial-Killer detector

Alec Wilkinson, reporting for The New Yorker, profiled Thomas Hargrove, who is deep into finding serial killers algorithmically and through public data: Thomas Hargrove is a homicide archivist.

Bomb contaminants where you live


Lena Groeger, Ryann Grochowski Jones and Abrahm Lustgarten, reporting for ProPublica with a searchable map of sites in need of bomb cleanup: The military spends more than a billion dollars a year to clean up sites its operations have contaminated with toxic waste and explosives.

Microsoft Excel painter

Remember the artist Tatsuo Horiuchi who uses Microsoft Excel to paint scenery? Four years later, he’s still at it.

Flawed hate crime data collection

Data can provide you with important information, but when the collection process is flawed, there’s not much you can do.

[For Members] Compact Ways to Visualize Distributions in R


For when you want to show or compare several distributions but don't have a lot of space. Read More

High-detail landscape using lidar data


Lidar, which is like radar but with lasers instead of radio waves, can provide high-detail surveys of the land.

Drawing with noise


This looks like a fun Processing tutorial by Etienne Jacob. Use noise to draw organic-ish loopy GIFs.

800 pages of Tinder data

Judith Duportail, writing for the Guardian, requested her personal data from dating service Tinder. She got back 800 pages of all the information she voluntarily gave away.

Stopping a nuclear missile fired at the US


I hate that this feels like something civilians should know. Bonnie Berkowitz and Aaron Steckelberg, reporting for the Washington Post, describe with a graphic how the United States might counter a nuclear missile fired by North Korea.

Generations of tech, as seen through video source, music players, and internet access


In a fun piece by Reuben Fischer-Baum, reporting for The Washington Post: In the past three decades, the United States has seen staggering technological changes.

[For Members] How I Made That: Interactive Heatmap


Add interaction so that you can show different segments of the data and allow comparisons. Read More

Middle-class tax cuts and increases from Senate bill


A lot of tax debate centers around the “average” American family, with focus on both tax cuts and increases for what seems like the same groups of people.

Choose Your Own Career Paths


Shifting from one occupation to another can take a swing in the career path. Given your current job, what paths could you take?

Chart search popularity


Anna Vital, in collaboration with the Google News Lab, shows the search popularity of chart types, books about charts, and tools for charting.

Uber got hacked and then paid the hackers $100k to not tell anyone

This is fine. Totally normal. Eric Newcomer reporting for Bloomberg: Hackers stole the personal data of 57 million customers and drivers from Uber Technologies Inc., a massive breach that the company concealed for more than a year.

Facebook still allowed race exclusion for housing advertisers

Last year, ProPublica revealed that Facebook allowed housing advertisers to exclude races in their campaigns.

Google collected Android users’ location without permission

Keith Collins reporting for Quartz: Since the beginning of 2017, Android phones have been collecting the addresses of nearby cellular towers—even when location services are disabled—and sending that data back to Google.


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