All Your Web In One Place.

Everything you want to read - news, your favorite blogs, art and more - in one convenient place designed for you.

Learn more about MultiPLX or signup for personalized experience.


The Principle of Infinite Pains: Legendary Filmmaker Maya Deren on Cinema, Life, and Her Advice to Aspiring Filmmakers


“The love of life itself… seems to me larger than the loving attention to a life. But, of course, each contains the other…” Russian-born American filmmaker, poet, photographer, choreographer, and critic Maya Deren (April 29, 1917–October 13, 1961) endures as one of humanity’s most significant experimental filmmakers and champions of independent cinema.

Little Tree: An Uncommonly Beautiful and Subtle Japanese Pop-Up Book about the Cycle of Life


“No one notices such a small presence…” Pop-up books have a singular magic, but even the pioneering vintage “interactive” picture-books of Italian graphic designer Bruno Munari can’t compare to the beauty, subtlety, and exquisite elegance of those by Japanese graphic designer and book artist Katsumi Komagata.

Hans Christian Andersen’s Daily Routine


From coffee time to bedtime, via a necessary stretch of royal tedium. I have a longstanding fascination with the daily routines of writers — most recently, those of C.S.

Control, Surrender and the Paradox of Self-Transcendence: Wisdom from a Vintage Scandinavian Children’s Book


“It’s a pity that exciting things always stop happening when you’re not afraid of them anymore and would like to have a little fun.” “It is the first thing any one has to learn in order to live,” Henry Miller wrote in comparing the art of living to dance, driven by rhythm into which the dancer must relax.

What to Do When Your Wife Is More Successful than You: Wise Advice from Tchaikovsky’s Father, 150 Years Ahead of Its Time


“Married happiness is based upon mutual respect, and you would no more permit your wife to be a kind of servant, than she would ask you to be her lackey.” Eastern Europe is not exactly a region known for empowering women and promoting gender equality.

Control, Surrender and the Paradox of Self-Transcendence: Wisdom from a Vintage Scandinavian Children’s Book


“It’s a pity that exciting things always stop happening when you’re not afraid of them anymore and would like to have a little fun.” “It is the first thing any one has to learn in order to live,” Henry Miller wrote in comparing the art of living to dance, driven by rhythm into which the dancer must relax.

To Paint Is to Love Again: Henry Miller on Art, How Hobbies Enrich Us, and Why Good Friends Are Essential for Creative Work


“What sustains the artist is the look of love in the eyes of the beholder. Not money, not the right connections, not exhibitions, not flattering reviews.” One particularly icy winter day not too long ago, I reluctantly retired my bike, took the subway into Manhattan, and gave up my seat to a kindly woman a few decades my senior.

Bertrand Russell on Boredom, Excitement, Parenting, and How to Cultivate the Essential Capacity for Fruitful Monotony


“A generation that cannot endure boredom will be a generation of little men… of men in whom every vital impulse slowly withers, as though they were cut flowers in a vase.” Between the time Kierkegaard contemplated boredom and psychoanalyst Adam Phillips made his bewitching case for why the capacity for it is essential for a full life, Bertrand Russell (May 18, 1872–February 2, 1970) tussled with the subject more elegantly than any other thinker before or since.

Mary Oliver on What Attention Really Means and Her Moving Eulogy to Her Soul Mate


“Attention without feeling … is only a report.” Mary Oliver is one of our era’s most beloved and prolific poets — a sage of wisdom on the craft of poetry and a master of its magic; a woman as unafraid to be witty as she is to wise.

Peanuts and the Quiet Pain of Childhood: How Charles Schulz Made an Art of Difficult Emotions


“[Charlie Brown] reminded people, as no other cartoon character had, of what it was to be vulnerable, to be small and alone in the universe, to be human — both little and big at the same time.” J.R.R.

How to Marry Money and Meaning: An Animated Field Guide to Finding Fulfilling Work in the Modern World


The six psychological pillars of a satisfying life. “To not have entirely wasted one’s life seems to be a worthy accomplishment, if only for myself,” wrote Charles Bukowski in his magnificent letter of gratitude to the man who helped him quit a soul-sucking day job to become a full-time writer.

The Paradox of Intellectual Promiscuity: Stephen Jay Gould on What Nabokov’s Butterfly Studies Reveal About the Unity of Creativity


“There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.” The history of human culture is rife with creators hailed as geniuses in one domain who also had a notable but lesser-known talent in another — take, for instance, Richard Feynman’s sketches, J.R.R.

How Jane Goodall Turned Her Childhood Dream into Reality: A Sweet Illustrated Story of Purpose and Deep Determination


A heartening testament to the power of undivided intention. “One should want only one thing and want it constantly,” young André Gide half-observed, half-resolved in his journal.

The Wisdom of No Escape: Pema Chödrön on Gentleness, the Art of Letting Go, and How to Befriend Your Inner Life


“Our neurosis and our wisdom are made out of the same material. If you throw out your neurosis, you also throw out your wisdom.” Pema Chödrön (b.

Happy Birthday, Susan Sontag: The Beloved Writer on the Problem with “Content” and the Perils of Interpretation


“Our task is not to find the maximum amount of content in a work of art… Our task is to cut back content so that we can see the thing at all.” “There are no facts, only interpretations,” Nietzsche wrote in his notebook in the late 1880s.

Why Not to Put a Raincoat on Your Dog: A Cognitive Scientist Explains the Canine Umwelt


“If we want to understand the life of any animal, we need to know what things are meaningful to it.” In Anna Karenina, Tolstoy’s Levin observes his dog Laska one evening — “she opened her mouth a little, smacked her lips, and settling her sticky lips more comfortably about her old teeth, she sank into blissful repose” — and finds in her behavior a “token of all now being well and satisfactory,” mirroring the “blissful repose” he so desires in his own life.

Joan Didion on Driving as Secular Worship and Self-Transcendence


“Participation requires a total surrender, a concentration so intense as to seem a kind of narcosis, a rapture-of-the-freeway.” Many years ago, an imaginative campaign for Mini Cooper reframed driving, something drudgerous, as motoring, something joyful.

The Art of Tough Love: Samuel Beckett Shows You How to Give Constructive Feedback on Your Friends’ Creative Work


“If I were less concerned with you I should simply say it is very good.” If it is the duty of friends to hold up a mirror to one another, as Aristotle believed, and if true friendship is the dual gift of truth and tenderness, as Emerson eloquently argued, then it is a chief task of friendship to hold up a truthful but tender mirror to those things which the friend holds most dear — including the labors of love that are one’s creative work.

A Vintage Illustrated Love Letter to Books: What They Are, How They’re Made, and Why They Matter to Us


“There is a reason for nearly everything.” Zen monks in 12th-century China bemoaned books as a perilous distraction to be avoided at all costs, and yet we’ve come to embrace that singular medium of immersive contemplation as one of life’s greatest joys.

How to Give Constructive Feedback on Your Friends’ Creative Work: A Lesson in Tough-Love Criticism from Samuel Beckett


“If I were less concerned with you I should simply say it is very good.” If it is the duty of friends to hold up a mirror to one another, as Aristotle believed, and if true friendship is the dual gift of truth and tenderness, as Emerson eloquently argued, then it is a chief task of friendship to hold up a truthful but tender mirror to those things which the friend holds most dear — including the labors of love that are one’s creative work.


Loading...