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The House Where Hitler Was Born


Braunau am Inn, on the south bank of the Inn river, close to the border with Germany, is a charming little town in Austria.

The Terrifying Beauty of Melting Icecaps


Every summer, as the air warms up and the sunlight beats down on the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, pools of brilliantly blue melt water are formed across the pristine white landscape.

The House Made of Newspapers


If you go to Rockport someday, in Massachusetts, the United States, take some time to drive down Pigeon Hill Street and look out for a sign that says “Paper House”.

Ecce Homo: The Botched Painting That Saved a Town


Eighty-three year old amateur artist Cecilia Giménez had nothing but good intentions when she turned her attention towards a deteriorating fresco of Jesus Christ painted on the walls of the Sanctuary of Mercy church, in the small Spanish town of Borja.

A Hanging Tree, Graves And Hemingway: The Colorful History of Captain Tony's Saloon


There appears to be nothing remarkable about Captain Tony's Saloon housed in a yellow, two-storied building at 428 Greene Street in Key West, Florida.

Kitsault: The Ghost Town Where Lights Are Still On But No One’s Home


Think ghost town and you’ll probably imagine ruins —roofless houses, dirty broken windows, rotting floors, but at Kitsault, on the North Coast of British Columbia, Canada, you’ll find rows upon rows of immaculately kept houses, shopping centers, restaurants, banks, pubs and theatres, all abandoned and sitting empty but untouched and spotless.

The Infamous Mauthausen Stairs of Death


The Mauthausen concentration camp, situated about 20 kilometers east of the city of Linz in Upper Austria, was the hub of one of the largest labor camp complexes in the German-controlled part of Europe, with a central camp near the village of Mauthausen, and nearly one hundred other subcamps located throughout Austria and southern Germany.

La Pascualita, The Corpse Bride


Peering out from behind the glass window of a small bridal shop in Chihuahua, Mexico, stands a tall, slender figure dressed in bridal costume.

The Second Life of Wind Turbine Blades


As the world pushes towards renewable energy, the wind energy industry comes to the forefront as a clean and a genuinely green energy.

The Frankincense Trees of Wadi Dawkah


For more than 5,000 years, the Arabs have traded two highly prized fragrances —frankincense and myrrh— obtained from trees that grow exclusively in the southern end of the Arabian Peninsula.

Semaphore: The World’s First Telegraph


Smoke signals and beacons have been used to relay messages over short distances since ancient times, but the only reliable way to send messages over long distances was to dispatch a horse-riding messenger or a homing pigeon —until the arrival of the electrical telegraph.

Rosalia Lombardo: The Mummy That Blinks


Rosalia Lombardo was only two years old when she died from pneumonia in 1920. Her premature death left her father so heartbroken that he approached the noted embalmer, Alfredo Salafia, and asked him to preserve Rosalia’s body.

The Museum of Bad Art


On rare occasions, a thrift store or a pawnshop can yield items of extreme value, but these are hardly the places you can expect to bump into the museum director of the Louvre or the Metropolitan.

London Necropolis Railway: The Train For The Dead


It was a difficult time to be alive in 1848 London, and worse still to be dead. A cholera epidemic had just swept through the city killing nearly 15,000 of its inhabitants, and bodies were literally pilling up besides churches waiting to be buried.

Oasis Bordello Museum: A 1988 Cat House Frozen in Time


In the heart of the Silver Valley mining district in the US state of Idaho, is an old dusty town called Wallace with a population of about eight hundred.

The Anti-Communist Dwarves of Wroclaw


Scattered throughout the city of Wroclaw, Poland, are hundreds of small bronze statues of dwarves. They began appearing in the streets in 2005, but their roots go back to the 1980s, to an anti-communist underground movement called the Orange Alternative.

Venice Minus Water


For the second year in a row, low tides in Venice have sunk to such record levels that it has left the city almost entirely without water.

Casey: The Small Town of Big Things


At just over two square miles and with less than 3,000 inhabitants, the town of Casey in Illinois might be among the smaller towns of the United States, but it's home to some of the biggest things in the world.

The World's Smallest Monuments


The Russian city of Tomsk is home to the smallest public monument in the world —a tiny bronze frog, sitting on top of a smooth rock.

Venice Minus Water


For the second year in a row, low tides in Venice have sunk to such record levels that it has left the city almost entirely without water.


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