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The Forgotten Nubian Pyramids of Menroe


About 200 km northeast of the Sudanese capital, Khartoum, in a valley known as Nubia, lies the remains of three ancient Kushite kingdoms.

The Squatters of Grande Hotel Beira


You might not know this, but Mozambique is one of the fastest growing tourist destination in the world.

The Unfinished Obelisk of Aswan


The granite quarries located along the Nile, in the city of Aswan, supplied some of the finest quality stones for the construction of temples, sculptures and monuments in ancient Egypt.

The Buddhas of Bamiyan


On the cliff face of a sandstone mountain, visible from the ancient Silk Road near the town of Bamiyan in Afghanistan, are two massive voids left by two monumental statues of Buddha that once stood there.

Jealous Wall: Ireland’s Largest Folly


The Belvedere House and Gardens located on the shores of Lough Ennell near Mullingar, County Westmeath in Ireland, contains several architectural oddities and follies, including the largest one in Ireland—the aptly named “Jealous Wall”.

The Bahrain World Trade Center Has Built-In Wind Turbines


Since the last few years an increasing number of green buildings are being constructed in the developed and developing world, focusing on environmentally responsible and resource-efficient design.

The Floating Fish Farms of China


In the sheltered coastal waters of the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea, the East China Sea and the South China Sea, there are large fish farms where marine crustaceans such as shrimps, and molluscs such as oysters, are raised in artificial enclosures.

The Spectacular Sets of Early 20th Century New York Theater


Many theatrical set designers today follow the maxim of “less is more”, but in the old days when theaters had to compete with moving pictures, plays frequently featured elaborate and extravagant sets built with great attention to detail.

Inside The Strange World of Soviet Sanatoriums


In Soviet Russia, vacations were as purposeful as work. Many state workers of the era, instead of wasting time in idleness, used the holidays to spend time at a sanatorium—which is like a modern-day spa but with a strong medical component.

Alexander Graham Bell's Tetrahedral Kites


Alexander Graham Bell is best remembered for inventing the telephone, but the great Scottish inventor’s interests weren’t limited to just one field.

Moscow’s Bagel House


In the early 1970s, Russian architect Evgeny Stamo and engineer Alexander Markelov came up with plans for an unusual house in the capital city Moscow.

Rivers of Blood: The Aftermath of Eid al-Adha in Dhaka


Early last month, a macabre image of a little girl posing in what appears to be a street flooded with blood-stained rainwater went viral over the internet.

The Tumuli Lava Blisters


In the relatively flat Harman Valley, located between Wallacedale and Byaduk, south of Mount Napier in Victoria, Australia, are peculiar rocky mounds, like blisters on land.

The Earth Pyramids of South Tyrol


At many places across South Tyrol, in northern Italy, one can see a peculiar geological formation called “earth pyramids”.

Ireland’s Famine Follies


In the grounds of the Castletown Estate, near the Irish town of Maynooth, is a large stone structure comprising of interlocking arches, adorned by stone pineapples and eagles, and topped by a massive obelisk pillar.

A Garden In A Sinkhole


The region in the southeast of South Australia, near Mount Gambier, is littered with many volcanic and karst features such as volcanic craters, lakes, limestone caves, water-filled caves and sinkholes.

The Mysterious Sajama Lines of Bolivia


Crisscrossing the highland plains in western Bolivia is a network of thousands of near perfectly straight lines etched into the ground.

The Stockholm Telephone Tower


By the late 19th century, the miracle device called the telephone had been invented but the simple concept of undergrounding telephone cables had eluded engineers.

Appian Way, The First Roman Road


Of the many things the Romans were famous for, roads rank pretty high in the list by importance, along with bridges, viaducts and canals.

London’s Cabmen's Shelters


Scattered throughout the streets of London, often overlooked, are small green sheds that have been offering shelter and hot food to the city’s cab drivers since 1875.


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