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Walking Past the White House: March comes in January


by Maniza Naqvi A very decent, elegant, graceful and intelligent man, the kind who opens doors for his wife, and wins a Nobel prize for Peace just by being has for eight years occupied the White House, furthering and expanding the indecency of war.

THE LIMINALITY OF LYME DISEASE


by Genese Sodikoff One does not normally think about infection, illness, and recovery in terms of a three-staged "rite of passage" as European ethnographer Arnold van Gennep defined it, although catching a disease certainly involves a period of physical transition and disruption of our sense of self.

Monday Poem


"All humans are genetically 99.9 per cent identical.”                                 —Roger Highfield, Science Editor Great Wall, Tremendous Wall .

perceptions


Jiang Zhi. Love Letters (12), 2014. Archival inkjet prints. "In 2010, Jiang Zhi’s wife, whose name meant Orchid, died suddenly at the age of 37.

Will the End of Obamacare Mean the End of Cancer Care?


by Carol A. Westbrook You can't afford to have cancer without insurance. Medical bills from cancer run from tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of dollars, not to mention the unreimbursed personal costs, such as loss of income, babysitting, caregiver's costs, and transportation.

The Wedding Singer: Take a Ride


by Christopher Bacas My first paid gig: volunteer fire hall, Saturday night. The leader picked me up at my house and drove to a small township outside the city.

My Grandfather's Ghost


by Elise Hempel I remember my grandfather, sometime in the 1970s, sitting in his checkered wing-chair on the back porch of his Chicago house, his slippered feet propped as usual on the ottoman, complaining that there were too many Blacks appearing now on TV, as we all watched some sitcom or variety show after Sunday dinner.

CATSPEAK


by Brooks Riley

Ch-ch-ch-changes


by Max Sirak There's a reason change is hard. It's biology's fault. Thomas Lewis, Fari Amini, and Richard Lannon write in their book, A General Theory of Love, "Because human beings remember with neurons, we are disposed to see more of what we have already seen, hear anew what we have heard most often, think just what we have always thought." The game is rigged.

Walking Past the White House: March comes in January


by Maniza Naqvi A very decent, elegant, graceful and intelligent man, the kind who opens doors for his wife, and wins a Nobel prize for Peace just by being has for eight years occupied the White House, furthering and expanding the indecency of war.

Wallace Stevens, the Detached Poet


Mark Dunbar in The American Conservative: The European poet Paul Celan once said that a poem “intends another, needs this other, needs an opposite.” For Wallace Stevens, this otherness was the world at large—the reason, perhaps, why his poetry contained so little but expressed so much.

The History of Popularity


Rayyan Al-Shawaf in the Los Angeles Review of Books: David Hajdu, on the first page of Love for Sale: Pop Music in America, dismisses the category of popular music: Of the countless terms for categories of music […] the least useful phrase I know is “popular music.” It provides no information about the music itself: no suggestion of how it sounds or what mood it might conjure, no indication of the traditions it grows from or defies, and no hint of whether it could be good for dancing, for solitary listening, or for anything else.

Both NASA and NOAA declare that our planet is experiencing record-breaking warming for the third year in a row


Andrea Thompson in Scientific American: 2016 was the hottest year in 137 years of record keeping and the third year in a row to take the number one slot, a mark of how much the world has warmed over the last century because of human activities, U.S.

Moral Polarization and Many Pussyhats


John Holbo in Crooked Timber: I agree with a lot in this piece by Will Wilkinson. But I disagree with stuff he says after asking the question ‘why is our moral culture polarizing?

Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains


Jean-Paul Delahaye in Inference Review: In November 2008, a paper entitled “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System” was published online.1 The system described in the paper, including a monetary unit termed “bitcoins,” embodied the world’s first cryptocurrency.

william onyeabor (1946 - 2017)

jimmy snuka (1943 - 2017)

buddy greco (1926 - 2017)

Sunday Poem

The depth of value of a thing is in how much its missed. ............................ —Roshi Bob The Executive’s Death Merchants have multiplied more than the stars of heaven Half the population are like the long grasshoppers    That sleep in the bushes in the cool of the day;  The sound of their wings is heard at noon, muffled, near the earth.  The crane handler dies; the taxi driver dies, slumped over    In his taxi.

Reality Is Not What It Seems


Ian Thomson in The Guardian: Carlo Rovelli’s slim poetic meditation Seven Brief Lessons on Physics managed to clarify the troubling uncertainties of Einsteinian relativity, quantum theory and other physical exotica.


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