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High Hitler: how Nazi drug abuse steered the course of history


Rachel Cooke in The Guardian: The German writer Norman Ohler lives on the top floor of a 19th-century apartment building on the south bank of the river Spree in Kreuzberg, Berlin.

A non-probabilistic quantum theory produces unpredictable results


Lisa Zyga in Phys.org: Quantum measurements are often inherently unpredictable, yet the usual way in which quantum theory accounts for unpredictability has long been viewed as somewhat unsatisfactory.

The earliest known Arabic short stories in the world have just been translated into English for the first time


Robert Irwin in The Independent: The Ottoman sultan Selim the Grim – having defeated the Mamluks in two major battles in Syria and Egypt – entered Cairo in 1517.

After the End of Truth: Beyond Post-Modernism

Hannah Dawson, Hilary Lawson, John Searle, and Rana Mitter discuss: Watch more videos on iai.tv

A museum’s misguided attempt to rescue the past


Rachel Poser at Harper's Magazine: The Breuer building, a mean pile of granite and concrete that squats darkly on a corner of Manhattan’s Upper East Side, was built as a kind of monument to the Metropolitan Museum’s long-standing distaste for contemporary art.

poetry and politics


Frank Guan at The Point: If poetry has a distinct class character, it also has a pronounced racial bent.

farming in space


Freeman Dyson at the NYRB: Farming is an art that achieved success after innumerable failures. So it was in the past and so it will be in the future.

Hillary Clinton Brings Out the Real Donald Trump


John Cassidy in The New Yorker: Words matter when you run for President,” Hillary Clinton said toward the end of Monday night’s happening at Hofstra University, on Long Island.

When a Spouse Dies, Resilience Can Be Uneven


Jane E. Brody in The New York Times: Losing a beloved life partner is never easy at any age, no matter the circumstance.

Tuesday Poem

A Dream Deferred . What happens to a dream deferred?        Does it dry up        like a raisin in the sun?

Monday Photograph


S. Abbas Raza. Downtown Manhattan at sunset from the roof of the New Museum. July, 2016 Digital photograph.

The Dangerous Discounting of Donald Trump


by Ali Minai By this point in US Election 2016, everyone acknowledges that the Presidential candidacy of Donald Trump is one of the most transformative phenomena to arise in American society in a long time – possibly since the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, of which it is, in some ways, a perverted mirror image.

OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES AND QUANTUM COOPERATION


by Tasneem Zehra Husain   There's no doubt about it: conflict commands attention.    Perhaps it made sense as an evolutionary strategy.

Vladimir Židovec Overshares


by Holly A. Case Croatian State Archives, main reading room This story—a true one—is about a graphomaniac.

MOOTING AN ELEPHANT


by Richard King When economist Branko Milanović first published his now-famous chart showing changes in global income distribution between 1988 and 2008 he furnished the world with a neat explanation for the various anti-establishment types now rocking the boat of Western politics: sandwiched between the Asian middle class and an increasingly bloated 1%—the winners from twenty years of "high" globalisation—the middle class of the rich world had been left behind and was voting in the rabblerousers.

The European Union used to solve collective problems, now they are killing it


by Thomas R. Wells Collective action problems pit individual selfishness against the collective interest in areas as diverse as pollution, trade, peace, and public roads.

CATSPEAK


by Brooks Riley

Frugality, simplicity, and environmentalism


by Emrys Westacott Many people today are drawn toward the ideals, values, and lifestyles that fall under the broad concept of "simple living." Downsizing, downshifting, embracing radical frugality, building and living in "tiny houses," going back to the land, growing one's own food, choosing greater self-sufficiency over consumerism, and seeking to preserve or revive traditional crafts: these are all part of this trend.

On "The Discrete Charm of Geometry"


by Carl Pierer As in any other academic field, outsiders as well as insiders often ask what do pure mathematicians actually do?

Alice Maher: The Glorious Maid of the Charnel House


by Sue Hubbard Purdy Hicks Gallery, London Ideas of shape-shifting are ancient. The possibility that a person can take the form of another being - usually an animal - can be traced back thousands of years, across diverse cultures, continents and religions.


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