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The Only Way Out of the Apocalypse Is Through


Published earlier this year, Claire Cameron's novel, The Bear, opens on a very dark night: On a family camping trip, a savage attack from a 300-pound black bear orphans five-year-old Anna and her younger brother, sending them on a terrifying flight for survival through the Canadian wilderness, ending their world as they know it.

The Best Books of October, Part Two: A Smorgasbord of Books


Last week I wrote about the Editors' first five picks in October’s Best Books of the Month and promised to write about the rest of the picks this week.

Zeppelin Porn — "Jimmy Page by Jimmy Page"


About ten years ago, my wife stumbled across the Led Zeppelin film, The Song Remains the Same, which awakened the 14-year-old fanboy inside her.

Hauntingly Good Halloween Books for Kids


I love Halloween for many reasons (the candy, the costumes, the candy...) but particularly for how much fun it is for little ones.  Besides putting up spider webs and skeletons, or carving this year's pumpkins, Halloween is a great time for reading spooky, silly, and fun-filled children's books.  Here are a few of my old and new favorites: Little Boo by Stephen Wunderli: A little pumpkin seed tries to be scary but is laughed at instead.  Even when he grows into a seedling he’s still not scary.  The wind reassures him that his time will come he just needs to be patient and grow.  At last, the little seed has become a pumpkin and then a frightening—and very happy--jack-o-lantern.  Ages 3-7 Bunnicula in a Box by James Howe: A perennial favorite any time of year, the story of the Monroe family's latest pet, a rabbit named Bunnicula who may or may not be a vampire, has been entertaining kids through the course of seven books, all of which are collected for the first time in a paperback boxed set.  Ages 8-12 Frankenstein: A BabyLit® Anatomy Primer by Jennifer Adams: The latest board book in the popular BabyLit series uses good old Frankenstein to introduce simple anatomy like hands, feet, mouth, eyes, and of course a body.  Adorable illustrations and the usual fun play on a classic story we’ve come to expect from this series make this a perfect Halloween read.  Ages 2-6 A Very Witchy Spelling Bee by George Shannon: A spelling bee (that's spell in the sense of letters forming words vs.

Exclusive Excerpt: The Sweetest Sound, by Rick Bragg (From “Good Dog: True Stories of Love, Loss, and Loyalty”)


The Sweetest Sound (Excerpted from Good Dog: True Stories of Love, Loss, and Loyalty, a collection of stories inspired by Garden & Gun magazine’s popular “Good Dog” column.

Jim Gaffigan Eats His Way Across the USA


Jim Gaffigan has been making us laugh for years, both as a top performing stand-up comedian and the author of last year's best-seller, Dad Is Fat.  On stage, Gaffigan freely shares his thoughts, obsessions, and observations of food and food culture, and he brings that and more to a new book, Food: A Love Story.

Cook This: Chicken Parm in 30 Minutes, from Mark Bittman


I've never been good at being told what to do. In the kitchen, that resistance is to blame for the testy relationship I have with cookbooks.

An Amazon Exclusive: Neil Patrick Harris Reveals Everything


It's not often that you get a behind-the-scenes peek at a book's creation. Read on to see what it took to write Choose Your Own Autobiography by Neil Patrick Harris (and some other guy).

Graphic Novel Friday: The Long Halloween


October is here, October is here! With the onslaught of all things pumpkin-flavored (but who can resist?

The New Trailer for the "Unbroken" Movie

For those who haven't read Unbroken (I realize a lot of us have read it), there's still time to read the book before seeing the movie.

10 Songs: Greil Marcus and the Culture of Surprise


If rock & roll has achieved institution status, Greil Marcus certainly qualifies as one of its pillars.

YA Wednesday: Meg Wolitzer on "Belzhar"


Back in June I read a book called Belzhar that I'd been hearing about.  Author Meg Wolitzer's The Interestings was one of our Best Books of 2013 and prior to that I'd loved her novel for middle graders, The Fingertips of Duncan Dorfman, so I was eager to read her first book for young adults.  It's amazing.

National Book Award Finalists Announced


Drum roll, please. The National Book Awards shortlist was broadcast this morning. Celebrating the best in American literature, the winners will be announced at a ceremony on November 19 hosted by best-selling author, Daniel Handler (you might know him better by his other name--Lemony Snicket).

Where I Wrote It: John Twelve Hawks, on Writing his New Novel, "Spark"


Readers of Omnivoracious may be familiar with our "How I Wrote It" Q-&-A series, in which we ask authors to describe the writing of their book (including questions about their work space, their tools, their fuel--you can read them here).

"Apocalypse Now" Meets "Lord of the Rings" - An Interview with Fantasy Author Chris Evans


Fantasy author Chris Evans new novel Of Bone and Thunder goes on sale today. It's a book that, like many fantasies, revolves around war—but unlike most fantasies it focuses mainly on the grunts doing the fighting as opposed to the politicians moving the chess pieces.

Who Needs Pictures? B.J. Novak Tells the Story


From his work on The Office we already know B.J. Novak is funny, and we had a great time reading his book, One More Thing earlier this year.  It was when he came to our office for that book that I met Novak and he told me about the children's book he had coming out at the end of September.  A picture book format but with no pictures.

How I Wrote It: Walter Isaacson, on "The Innovators"


"We don’t often focus on how teamwork is key to innovation," says Walter Isaacson, whose new book explores the overlooked collaborations and breakthroughs that would eventually give us the personal computer and the Internet.  In The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, one of our Best Books of the Month, Isaacson shows how lone geniuses like Steve Jobs (the subject of his bestselling 2011 biography) didn't single-handedly create the digital age in which we now live.

The Best Books of October, Part One: Some Serious Reading


Maybe it's a fall publishing thing, but there is some pretty heady writing in the top 5 of our October Best Books of the Month.

Rumors of Tears: An Interview with Nicholas Sparks


If Stephen King is the King of Horror, Nicholas Sparks is, well, the King of Love. There’s no mystery to it, Sparks insists: “I just put people on dates and let them fall in love.” Across seventeen novels, nine of them adapted for film, that boy-meets-girl formula, which he's explored every angle, has worked amazingly well for Sparks.

Weekend Reading: Spies, Diggers, Some Murderers, and a Prig


As Chris mentioned last week, spring has been beautiful in Seattle, but the weather is starting to get dark out here.


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